Spouses and Childrens Scheme

Please select your Pension Scheme below:


Secondary, Community & Comprehensive Teachers Superannuation Scheme


Education & Training Board Teachers Superannuation Scheme


Single Public Service Pension Scheme

 

 


Secondary, Community & Comprehensive Teachers Superannuation Scheme

The Spouses’ and Children’s Scheme is designed to provide pension benefits for a teacher’s surviving spouse or civil partner and qualifying children in the event that a teacher dies either in service or in retirement. Membership of the Scheme has been compulsory for men appointed since 1969, and for women appointed since 1981. Initially the scheme was designed to provide survivors’ benefits for spouses and children of marriages contracted before retirement. In 2004, teachers were offered the opportunity to upgrade their membership of the Scheme to include marriages contracted post-retirement and to maintain the payment of benefits to surviving spouses who remarried. Most teachers took the opportunity to upgrade their membership at that time, although a minority elected to continue on the previous terms. With the passing into law of the Civil Partnership Act 2011, the benefits of the Scheme were extended to civil partners and their children. Finally, and very importantly, the benefits of the Scheme were extended to the spouses and children of same-sex marriages following the commencement of the Marriage Act 2015.

Cost:

Teachers contribute 1.5 % of their gross pensionable salary throughout their teaching career to the Spouses’ and Children’s Scheme. These contributions are supplemented by a terminal contribution taken from a teacher’s pension gratuity on retirement. Contributions are also payable on retirement for any years of service that a teacher is buying-back under the PCW Scheme at that time.

Benefits – Death in Service:

There are three benefits that may be payable should a teacher die while in teaching service. A death gratuity of between 1 and 1.5 times a teacher’s annual pensionable salary is payable on production of probate or letters of administration. The payment is made to the teacher’ personal representative, i.e. their executor (will) or administrator (no will). This payment is available whether or not the deceased teacher was a member of the Spouses’ and Children’s Scheme. For members of the Scheme, an amount equal to a month’s salary will be paid to the surviving spouse or civil partner for the first month after death. Thereafter, a survivor’s pension is payable to the spouse/civil partner. The value of the survivor’s pension is set at one-half of the potential pension that the deceased member would have earned had they completed their potential service, up to a maximum of 40 years.

This pension is payable for the rest of the surviving spouse/civil partner’s life and will continue to be paid should the surviving spouse/civil partner remarry, except where the deceased member did not upgrade their Scheme membership (see above). If there is a pension adjustment order in effect, consequent on a divorce or judicial separation, the survivor’s pension will be paid by the DES in accordance with its terms.

Survivors’ pensions are also payable to dependent children until their 16th birthday, or until their 22nd birthday if they remain in full-time education. The value of the pension paid for a child is set at one-third of the surviving spouse/civil partner’s pension, up to three children. If there are more than three surviving children, the sum of these pensions is set at an equal amount to the spouse/civil partner’s pension distributed equally amongst the surviving children. A children’s pension is also payable to an adult dependent child, without age limit, who is permanently incapacitated providing the infirmity existed form birth or arise while the child was eligible for benefit.

Benefits – Death in Retirement:

A teacher who dies in retirement will have already their received a pension gratuity when they retired. Survivors’ benefits, therefore, are limited to the pension paid to a surviving spouse/civil partner, and any qualifying children (see above). Where such a teacher retired on a Cost Neutral Early Retirement (CNER) basis, the actuarial reductions that will have been applied to that teacher’s pension will be disregarded in the calculation of the pensions paid to the surviving spouse/civil partner and qualifying children.




Education and Training Board Teachers Superannuation Scheme

The Spouses’ and Children’s Scheme is designed to provide pension benefits for a teacher’s surviving spouse or civil partner and qualifying children in the event that a teacher dies either in service or in retirement. Initially the scheme was designed to provide survivors’ benefits for spouses and children of marriages contracted before retirement. In 2004, teachers were offered the opportunity to upgrade their membership of the Scheme to include marriages contracted post-retirement and to maintain the payment of benefits to surviving spouses who remarried. Most teachers took the opportunity to upgrade their membership at that time, although a minority elected to continue on the previous terms. With the passing into law of the Civil Partnership Act 2011, the benefits of the Scheme were extended to civil partners and their children. Finally, and very importantly, the benefits of the Scheme were extended to the spouses and children of same-sex marriages following the commencement of the Marriage Act 2015.

Cost:

Teachers contribute 1.5 % of their gross pensionable salary throughout their teaching career to the Spouses’ and Children’s Scheme. These contributions are supplemented by a terminal contribution taken from a teacher’s pension gratuity on retirement. Contributions are also payable on retirement for any years of service that a teacher is buying-back under the PCW Scheme at that time.

Benefits – Death in Service:

There are three benefits that may be payable should a teacher die while in teaching service. A death gratuity of between 1 and 1.5 times a teacher’s annual pensionable salary is payable on production of probate or letters of administration. The payment is made to the teacher’ personal representative, i.e. their executor (will) or administrator (no will). This payment is available whether or not the deceased teacher was a member of the Spouses’ and Children’s Scheme. For members of the Scheme, an amount equal to a month’s salary will be paid to the surviving spouse or civil partner for the first month after death. Thereafter, a survivor’s pension is payable to the spouse/civil partner. The value of the survivor’s pension is set at one-half of the potential pension that the deceased member would have earned had they completed their potential service, up to a maximum of 40 years.

This pension is payable for the rest of the surviving spouse/civil partner’s life and will continue to be paid should the surviving spouse/civil partner remarry, except where the deceased member did not upgrade their Scheme membership (see above). If there is a pension adjustment order in effect, consequent on a divorce or judicial separation, the survivor’s pension will be paid by an ETB in accordance with its terms.

Survivors’ pensions are also payable to dependent children until their 16th birthday, or until their 22nd birthday if they remain in full-time education. The value of the pension paid for a child is set at one-third of the surviving spouse/civil partner’s pension, up to three children. If there are more than three surviving children, the sum of these pensions is set at an equal amount to the spouse/civil partner’s pension distributed equally amongst the surviving children. A children’s pension is also payable to an adult dependent child, without age limit, who is permanently incapacitated providing the infirmity existed form birth or arise while the child was eligible for benefit.

Benefits – Death in Retirement:

A teacher who dies in retirement will have already their received a pension gratuity when they retired. Survivors’ benefits, therefore, are limited to the pension paid to a surviving spouse/civil partner, and any qualifying children (see above). Where such a teacher retired on a Cost Neutral Early Retirement (CNER) basis, the actuarial reductions that will have been applied to that teacher’s pension will be disregarded in the calculation of the pensions paid to the surviving spouse/civil partner and qualifying children.



Single Public Service Pension Scheme

The Single Public Service Pension Scheme provides pension benefits for a teacher’s surviving spouse or civil partner and qualifying children in the event that a teacher dies either in service or in retirement. The benefits of the Scheme were extended to the spouses and children of same-sex marriages following the commencement of the Marriage Act 2015. The cost of survivors’ benefits are incorporated in the contribution that teachers make to the Pension Scheme every fortnight or month from their salary.

Benefits – Death in Service:

There are two benefits that may be payable should a teacher die while in teaching service, and providing they have been a member of the Scheme for at least 24 months. A death gratuity of up to twice the teacher’s pensionable salary earned in the previous year (expressed on a full-time basis) is payable on production of probate or letters of administration. The payment is made to the teacher’ personal representative, i.e. their executor (will) or administrator (no will). Thereafter, a survivor’s pension is payable to the spouse/civil partner. The value of the survivor’s pension is set at one-half of the pension that the deceased member would have earned had they retired on medical grounds at the date of death.

This pension is payable for the rest of the surviving spouse/civil partner’s life and will continue to be paid should the surviving spouse/civil partner remarry. If there is a pension adjustment order in effect, consequent on a divorce or judicial separation, the survivor’s pension will be paid in accordance with its terms. Separate arrangements apply for teachers who die in service but who have less than 24 months service.

Survivors’ pensions are also payable to dependent children until their 16th birthday, or until their 22nd birthday if they remain in full-time education. The value of the pension paid for a child is set at one-third of the surviving spouse/civil partner’s pension, up to three children. If there are more than three surviving children, the sum of these pensions is set at an equal amount to the spouse/civil partner’s pension distributed equally amongst the surviving children. A children’s pension is also payable to an adult dependent child, without age limit, who is permanently incapacitated providing the infirmity existed form birth or arise while the child was eligible for benefit.

Benefits – Death in Retirement:

A teacher who dies in retirement will have already their received a pension gratuity when they retired. Survivors’ benefits, therefore, are limited to the pension paid to a surviving spouse/civil partner, and any qualifying children (see above).